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Hunza Style Quesadilla

Hunza style Quesadilla
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Hunza style quesadilla is a traditional dish locally famous as Burus Sapik, where Burus refers to the cheese in Burushaski language of Hunza and Sapik refers to the flour tortilla. Burus Sapik comprises a flour tortilla, homemade low-fat cheese and herb stuff.  you can make a full burus sapik with two tortillas with a layer of cheese and herb mixture between them. You can make a single serving of  Hunza style quesadilla by using a single tortilla and stuffing it with cheese and herb mixture and folding it into half.Read More

Hunza Corn Bread

Hunza Corn Bread
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In Gilgit Baltistan and Chitral we have several bread recipes. we make some on special occasions; we make some of them specifically to eat with tea in the morning and evening. We make others to eat with curries. Hunza corn bread is one of many breads which goes well with tea and therefore, is part of our breakfast items. The ingredients for Hunza corn bread I have used are very basic and simple but we can add more ingredients. We can use milk instead of water to knead  and we can also addRead More

Hunza Cream of wheat

Hunza Cream of wheat
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Hunza Cream of wheat is locally known as Mull, which is an easy to digest porridge made with wheat flour and water. The seasoning our mum would use for this porridge was salt but now younger moms prefer sugar.  The women in Hunza get to eat this for weeks after their delivery. The whole grain wheat flour is considered best for this recipe. Here we are making the sweeter version of mull, but you can make it savory by adding a pinch of salt in the water before adding anyRead More

Clarifying Homemade Butter

Clarifying homemade butter
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Livestock is one of the major sources of living in Hunza and therefore consumption of dairy items like homemade butter has common use in most of the traditional dishes we make.  Clarifying homemade butter is time consuming and is done when we are sending it to someone living far away and it must cover long distances to avoid the spoilage at varying temperatures while traveling. It is also clarified to be used with a traditional porridge locally known as Mull which is made on child birth and women get toRead More

Hunza Homemade Noodles Laqsha

Hunza Homemade Noodles Laqsha
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Khamali is the staple of Hunza Cuisine and hence they eat and want to eat it with every dish, they eat them with rice too. Yeah, with rice 😊. People of Hunza love Khamali so much that they tried to use it in soups with some modifications and came up with the Hunza homemade noodles locally known as Laqsha. This is only my guess and opinion and the story can be a bit different. Hunza Homemade noodles are used in traditional Chapchy dawdo, tumuru dawdo(Wild thyme soup) which is aRead More

Shuwanchal

shuwanchal
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Shuwanchal is a vegetable that is grown in Hunza and around Gilgit Baltistan from spring to late summers. It is a beautiful leafy vegetable with vibrant green color. Unlike vegetables like Hoi we do not dry this vegetable for winter season. It tastes best when it is stir fried with onion. Shuwanchal looks similar to the wild edible vegetable Malva parviflora  which is a wild edible perennial herb but we grow this variety of vegetable from seeds. For cooking shuwanchal, we harvest the leaves with the tender green stems because theyRead More

Wild Thyme Soup

Wild Thyme soup
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Wild Thyme is known as Tumuru in Burushaski language of Hunza and we use tumuru in winters to make tumuru tea which is the best natural flu remedy I have experienced so far. This wild thyme soup is one of the thyme recipes we make and is known as tumuru dawdo which is beneficial for flu and cold. It is also consumed as a preventive measure against cold in Hunza in cold winter season. Ingredients for Wild Thyme soup: Garlic Cloves Wild thyme leaves Mint leaves A tablespoon of cooking oilRead More

Buckwheat Crepes

Buckwheat Flour

Buckwheat Crepes The only traditional dish I found most tricky is Buckwheat. If you really want the traditional crepe, a crepe that is gluten free, no other flour added to it then you need to be pro at making crepes on a nonstick pan. The only seasoning, we add to Buckwheat crepe is a pinch of salt. Thus, they are savory, and we eat them with soupy curries unlike the wheat flour crepes (Giyalling) which we eat with tea and they are brush with oily before we eat them. TheRead More

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